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This Weekend’s ‘Pink Moon’ Will Signal Positive Omens, Astrologists Say

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Heads up, skywatchers: There’s a pink moon making an appearance on April 29. Other than the obvious beauty of such a sight, the astrological meaning of a pink moon is yet another reason to camp out and gaze at it in awe.

What is a pink moon?

According to The Old Farmer’s Almanac, a pink moon gets its name from one of spring’s first flowers, the “moss pink.” Alternatively, it has also been called a full sprouting grass moon, the egg moon, and the fish moon. (But we think we like “pink moon” best.) Although the moon itself doesn’t turn pink, it does signal the welcome return of lots of pink on the ground in the form of lovely flowers. On top of that, the pink moon this year also hints at good things to come for all of us in the future.

The Pink Moon’s Meaning in Astrology

The pink moon of 2018 is a good omen for stability and success, according to Astrology King. It also offers benefits from the planet Saturn, including preparedness, steadiness, determination, and final success. For anyone who’s been having a tough time these past few months — especially considering the never-ending winter — this will probably be one of the best pick-me-ups in a while. Now, it’s worth noting that all these positive predictions don’t guarantee a totally stress-free week. The good news, though, is that your emotional strength and your instincts will apparently both be at their peaks. In other words, bring on the challenges, because you’ll be more than prepared to handle them!

When to Watch the Pink Moon

If you’re interested in gazing at the pink moon and soaking up all the positivity it has to offer, be sure to take a look at the clock before you step outside. The best time to watch the pink moon depends on where you’re located. Those on the East Coast can expect to see the pink moon rise at 7:31 p.m. For the folks in the Central Time Zone, 7:58 p.m. will be the best bet for getting a great view. People in the Mountain Zone should look up at 6:58 p.m. And moon gazers all the way out West should take a gander at 5:58 p.m.

Happy skywatching!

Next, learn about light pillars, the gorgeous natural phenomena often mistaken for UFOs, in the video below:

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